Any "preppers" out there?

RobinB

Well-Known Member
we had a dinner sampler night where each family member shared a dehydrated dinner meal just wanted to see which ones we liked, it was fun and we laughed a lot. many years ago would store MRE's but they got expensive and i know the hiker meals are pricey also but i like to keep some of that stuff on and as well. years ago my sister and i were walking out of the store and she was teasing me about buying a big can of powered eggs, but she had a carton of cigarettes, hum!

We bought some of the dehydrated meals, but haven't tried any. How were they?
 

Rose E.

Well-Known Member
I don't call myself a prepper but I try to live "Little House on the Prairie".
I collect the seeds from the garden for next years garden. I can, dehydrate and store my food. There are two wells on my property. For power outages I have gas and solar generators.
I do keep a get home bag in the car. That's because I don't trust governments.
My biggest draw back is I'm married to a man who wants to live like "Star Trek". He's waiting for the transporter.
 

Work4Peanuts

Well-Known Member
I don't consider myself a "prepper" but I like to think that with good home management I am more or less prepared for emergencies, with plans in place for the most common emergencies we have in our area. I have basic supplies for my family that I rotate as they get used, with enough stored water to last our family for several days.
I think the one thing that the Lord has laid upon my heart is that we shouldn't worry about the future, because He will provide our daily bread. Being prepared for basic things (like a power outage during an ice storm) falls under the Proverbs 31 description of a virtuous wife, but there comes a point where it's just flat out hoarding.
 

Jan51

Well-Known Member
Do most of you buy bottled water or put water in cleaned milk jugs with a few drops of bleach (which is what I do)? I've wondered how long it's good for--sometimes I dump out all my water, reclean, and put new water in. But if they haven't leaked, is that good for years?
 

ReadyOrNot

Well-Known Member
Do most of you buy bottled water or put water in cleaned milk jugs with a few drops of bleach (which is what I do)? I've wondered how long it's good for--sometimes I dump out all my water, reclean, and put new water in. But if they haven't leaked, is that good for years?
Jan51- I used the same method when I prepped for Y2K many years ago (our suburban water source is on the power grid, so I was worried). The water jugs lasted a few years, but eventually the plastic degraded and sprung tiny leaks. I think this would be a good method as long as the jugs are checked regularly and replaced every couple of years.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Jan51- I used the same method when I prepped for Y2K many years ago (our suburban water source is on the power grid, so I was worried). The water jugs lasted a few years, but eventually the plastic degraded and sprung tiny leaks. I think this would be a good method as long as the jugs are checked regularly and replaced every couple of years.
Most winters we'll lose electricity several times, and sometimes the outage can last a week or longer. I can store a meaningful amount of food and supplies for such times, but water... I don't have adequate means to store a meaningful amount of fresh water. Containers and space are both an issue.

I've tried melting snow in containers around our wood stove to use for toilet flushing... but it takes a ton of snow volume to get a few gallons of water...
 
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Work4Peanuts

Well-Known Member
I buy bottled water and I store it in plastic milk jugs. At Sam's around here you can get a very large amount of plastic drinking water for less than four dollars. If we go out (like day trips), and we want to grab a water, we can. That's how I rotate stock. The plastic milk jug water can be used for cleaning and gets rotated less often. I also buy distilled that my mom can use in her cpap machine.
 

sherryh

Well-Known Member
We bought some of the dehydrated meals, but haven't tried any. How were they?
we liked most but i think it was the food choice more than the brand. I figure it this way if you are in a situation where you need the meals it may not be about the taste but about having the food. The MRE's don't last as long as the dehydrated meals but i do think the Mountain House was good. The MER's are ready to go no added water where the Mountain House needs water, so that is a thought to concider. I have eaten a lot of MRE's and they are calories packed, but also heavy if you were to carry them any distance. My sister friend bought a dehydrator that he can make his own meals, which he says the food is much better, it will even dehydrate soups! He does a lot of mountain backpacking and now carries his home grown meals (luckily guy). I didn't ask the price but i know it was spendy.
 

Cindy S.

Well-Known Member
Most winters we'll lose electricity several times, and sometimes the outage can last a week or longer. I can store a meaningful amount of food and supplies for such times, but water... I don't have adequate means to store a meaningful amount of fresh water. Containers and space are both an issue.

I've tried melting snow in containers around our wood stove to use for toilet flushing... but it takes a ton of snow volume to get a few gallons of water...
I'm on a well. Our township fire dept has a big generator and welcomes us to fill our jugs at the fire station during a power outage.
 

Círeth

Well-Known Member
I've found out recently that UK radiators contain anti-freeze. So no bleeding them for water. If there was a problem with the water supply I'd hopefully have time to scrub out and fill the bath. Of course I'd then have to find a way to stop the water evaporating.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I've found out recently that UK radiators contain anti-freeze. So no bleeding them for water. If there was a problem with the water supply I'd hopefully have time to scrub out and fill the bath. Of course I'd then have to find a way to stop the water evaporating.
Cireth many years ago in the great Alaskan quake of 64 I was a little girl in the Yukon. Our papers were filled with days of stories and photos of survivors. How everyone coped. One story always captivated me and my mother.

A hair salon in Anchorage had just applied perm solution to one of their patrons. The hair dresser was horrified, because the water was gone in a flash and her patrons hair and scalp would soon have chemical burns if she didn't rinse it off. Thinking fast she bucketed out the water from the toilet tank (the clean reservoir for flushing purposes, not from the bowl for those in other countries whose systems may differ). She saved her client's hair, and scalp in the process.

If your toilet tanks are similar, they will hold at least a little clean fresh water that is safe for use. Just saying,
 

chaser

Just a twinkling from home!
Not a big prepper but have plenty of food/water on hand, maybe enough to last 3 months. The area we live in is heavily wooded, when the wind/storms blow it is possible to loose power for 3 weeks so I keep enough on hand to get us through including weapons, but if society crumbles and it looks to be a long term/permanent situation I do not think I want to try and survive in a big city in ruins. I would take my chances going cross country to my brothers farm. If the Rapture has taken place and the world is in chaos, we have bibles and messages we placed in the open areas explaining what has happened, why we are gone/ where we are and what they need to do, , and they are welcome to all we have in the house.
 

Jamielynn

Well-Known Member
I have stockpiled antibiotics and other prescriptions over the years (I don’t like taking them, but collect them when offered from doctors for emergencies) and keep them in a box with each medicine written down on a piece of paper and all of the potential uses for them. I figure that if an EMP strike occurs or a natural disaster, I’ll be able to help someone with these if need be! I also have a small straw water filtration system (it’s very small, got on amazon!) that I keep in a drawer with a battery operated am/fm radio and flashlights. I can’t stand clutter and am a “purger”, but the one thing I can’t bring myself to toss is my husbands massive collection of random candles he brought into our marriage. LOL They are stored away just Incase. I always make sure to have 2 cases of bottled water, one in the garage and one in the house. I really would like to get Costco’s emergency food kit, but it’s rather expensive!
 

Rose E.

Well-Known Member
Cireth many years ago in the great Alaskan quake of 64 I was a little girl in the Yukon. Our papers were filled with days of stories and photos of survivors. How everyone coped. One story always captivated me and my mother.

A hair salon in Anchorage had just applied perm solution to one of their patrons. The hair dresser was horrified, because the water was gone in a flash and her patrons hair and scalp would soon have chemical burns if she didn't rinse it off. Thinking fast she bucketed out the water from the toilet tank (the clean reservoir for flushing purposes, not from the bowl for those in other countries whose systems may differ). She saved her client's hair, and scalp in the process.

If your toilet tanks are similar, they will hold at least a little clean fresh water that is safe for use. Just saying,
Don't forget your hot water tank will still have water stored.
 

Kem

Citizen
This may have already been mentioned but antibiotics for use on animals are fine for humans also. You need to know the correct dosage of course but they can be purchased online and for a very reasonable price. The shelf life will vary but even an expired antibiotic will have some potency left.
 

Rose E.

Well-Known Member
This may have already been mentioned but antibiotics for use on animals are fine for humans also. You need to know the correct dosage of course but they can be purchased online and for a very reasonable price. The shelf life will vary but even an expired antibiotic will have some potency left.
I found a recipe online on how to make penicillin and you can get all the ingredients on Amazon. The process to make it is challenging. Plus,,,I have not had any Feds invading my farm because I checked online for the ingredients.
 

Cindy S.

Well-Known Member
This may have already been mentioned but antibiotics for use on animals are fine for humans also. You need to know the correct dosage of course but they can be purchased online and for a very reasonable price. The shelf life will vary but even an expired antibiotic will have some potency left.
you can also buy them at tractor supply or your local feed store.
 
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