Any "preppers" out there?

Lynn

Well-Known Member
Check out Berkey water filtration. You can get any size from water bottle to 3 gallons and they'll FULLY filter even raw sewage.
The Red Cross uses them in disaster areas.
I have 2 personal bottles ( we keep them in the truck, there's always water in a roadside ditch here) and a Royal ( next to largest size) in the kitchen.

4 filters will filter a half million gallons.
We have used the Berkey water filtration system for many years now. We keep a large on on our counter top, and we don't drink or cook with water from the faucet until it has been through the Berkey.
We are uncomfortable with chlorine in public water supply and feel better about using water that has first been filtered through our Berkey.
 

ReadyforSupper

Well-Known Member
We have used the Berkey water filtration system for many years now. We keep a large on on our counter top, and we don't drink or cook with water from the faucet until it has been through the Berkey.
We are uncomfortable with chlorine in public water supply and feel better about using water that has first been filtered through our Berkey.
We use ours like you do. We're on a well but we had the county test it and found high levels of 11dichlotoethelyne (I think I spelled that right) at 6.6 when 7 was considered toxic.

I could smell it in the water and everyone kept saying "it's the sulfur you're smelling" (I grew up with orange well water...I know danged good and well what sulfur smells like and I could smell petroleum.)

Turns out someone dumped a PVC solvent in the lake down the road.

It's kept us and my kennel animals safe for years.
 

sherryh

Well-Known Member
I see that this thread was started a few years ago but I would like to add that even if you are not a "prepper" you should store a few things. Like water a person can only live 4-7 days without it, even if you store a life straw, I have 2. Also I think medical supplies, like disinfectants, antibacterial, bandaids. I buy my sister preppers stuff for her birthday every year, for the main reason , she has an autistic son who she worries about . Both my husband and I have BOB (bug out bag) pack, if we never need them my prayer is that it would help someone else. Last year for her gift I got her a survival knife, this year I am sending her heirloom seeds. You may only just need enough to make your way to a shelter. Just saying
 

kathymendel

Well-Known Member
Living in southern California is scary in itself! I moved from Orange County to a more rural, out of the way area after my DH passed. People here seem to lean more conservative for the most part. I don't prep per-say.............but, I do keep a good two week+ supply of food in the house, and some extra water. I never know quite what to expect: Earthquakes or crazy people. I am concerned about the upcoming elections, and I may not want to venture out into public venues, such as stores, etc. if the liberals go off the rails. It could get very ugly fast just because it's California (and filled with nuts!).
 

Kem

Citizen
We do some prepping here especially now that we live in coastal SC and have hurricanes coming our way most summers though thankfully we have not been hit strongly since living down here. Being prepared for at least a week and possibly for a month is just being wise.
 

vmoon

Well-Known Member
When it cools off a bit more I'm going to pressure can again. I used to do it all the time but for some reason I just stopped. So going to make more spaghetti sauce and chili. Remember all you canners out there. When canning meat it needs to be 10lbs of pressure for 90 minutes. Check with your Ball canner book for your area.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I think a lot of this is good common sense country style. When people were more self reliant, they had to plan ahead. Now we are used to the grocery shelves being stocked, and plenty available at all hours even 24 hours a day at some stores. And we've got used to having electricity that gets repaired in 48 hours or so or faster.

But the same disasters befall us, from earthquakes to tornadoes and hurricanes, to fires and floods as our ancestors faced. Kind of depends on your area. My dad and grandad were used to living in dry country with forests around. So they always kept a huge distance between the cabin and the forest of cleared land as a fire break. Simple but people have forgotten that precaution.

I know for my area it's fires, but down in Vancouver it's the possibility of a big San Fransisco or Los Angeles style quake. For people living on Vancouver Island it's quakes and tsunamis that concern them.

Proverbs 22:3 says "A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are punished."

I think sometimes prepping as it's called, or simple common sense as I'd call it, gets a bad reputation because people HATE being reminded of awful possibilities that might face them around the next curve life throws---like the reality of hellfire for one example.

So people mock and make fun to make THEMSELVES feel better, more secure, safer somehow. Christian mockers say that the so called "prepper" is prepping for the Tribulation (and some might be doing just that, but certainly not all Christians who "prep")

The wise look ahead and prepare ahead.
 

Círeth

Well-Known Member
Agreed Kem. I don't expect to go through the trib. In my area the most likely threat is floods/storms disrupting supply lines of food and everyday stuff like toiletries. I want to be prepared for that kind of eventuality.

I need to stock up on dried food again. I have about a weeks worth of food at the moment. I really should have two. As for water well there a lot of radiators in this house. Those can be turned off and bled for water. I have plenty of blankets.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
Agreed Kem. I don't expect to go through the trib. In my area the most likely threat is floods/storms disrupting supply lines of food and everyday stuff like toiletries. I want to be prepared for that kind of eventuality.

I need to stock up on dried food again. I have about a weeks worth of food at the moment. I really should have two. As for water well there a lot of radiators in this house. Those can be turned off and bled for water. I have plenty of blankets.

Cireth for years I relied on a well stocked pantry to fall back on. I would buy tinned goods, dry goods like flour or coffee on the super sales and keep a certain number (it's no savings if it goes stale) on hand, when I began dipping into that supply I'd look for another case of tuna or big bag of rice on sale. I still have a certain amount,-- not what I had when the kids were living with us-- but if you slowly buy what you need in your pantry shelf as part of the grocery budget, you end up "shopping" in the pantry for sale prices so your costs go down overall.

In a power outage a freezer isn't a big help, but for budgeting, I used to buy meats and some frozen berries, veggies etc on sales and do the same sort of thing. Buying fresh veggies on sales, and freezing them on trays, then rattling the frozen bits into a zip lock freezer bag for use as needed.

Even if all you do is fill a few jugs with water and rotate them out every once in a while to keep that fresh, some tinned meat or fish or beans or good quality stews. Not much, just enough to eat one a day for a week.

A flashlight that works on a windup thing instead of a battery that dies or leaks. A radio same. We have a combination radio and flashlight that you wind up and creates it's own charge, and lasts a bit after each windup.

Put a few candles in a mason jar and some matches in another mason or canning jar with an air tight lid to keep them dry. Use the jar for safety as a candle holder.

Some dry shampoo, Gel hand sanitizer is helpful too in case the water is out. And some vaseline and first aide supplies.

Toilet paper, and some big heavy trash bags which can do all kinds of other uses besides trash like an emergency rain coat and you are set.Duct tape too. You can fix so much with plastic and duct tape

I always have thin wool sweaters we can use as thermal underclothes plus heavier sweaters and blankets. It needn't be special, just stuff you ordinarily use on the bed for extra warmth or on a cold day--the thin woolies sox and a top. Hat and gloves so you can bundle up.

remember that plastic jugs aren't going to last forever either, and may leak after some time. So you want to rotate your supply and use up the soup etc and replace as you use them up.

Date things with a sharpie black marker on the tops of tins or jar labels so you know when you got them, and put them into the pantry shelf.

If it's part of your normal rotation, part of what you'd normally eat it won't upset your tummy in an emergency when you are under stress, and it will be easy to rotate thru and keep it fresh.

That was the core of how I've "prepped" for years without adding a burden of extra cost and effort.
 
Last edited:

vmoon

Well-Known Member
just remember to rotate your stock. Save what you eat and eat what you save. If you don't you'll end up with less nutritious foods. love it and if I had more time i'd do it all the time. I'm not saving for the trib I'm saving for hard times that hit all of us from time to time. Example.. One Christmas my son was invited to his girlfriends Christmas celebration. Well, we didn't have anything to bring so we put a bow on a jar of pears we'd preserved and gave that as a gift. One year I made fesh bread and gave that. So many Ideas that don't cost a lot of money. If you can stock up on things buy cold meds a and tooth paste extra too brushes. soap, dawn, Clorox trashbags and a shovel to bury waste if no water. buy canned milk it keeps for six months without refrideration canned some ground beef nd buy hamburger helper. writes dates on everythingl Then have a day that you eat with you save and replace it. Rotate is the key. Follow the directions of your ball canner book. Take no chancesl ladies store up on your sanitary needs. Just use what you save and replace it. you won't be sorry. There have been times that I have raided my stock because of a slow week at work. Be creative. treat it as a hobby and have fun with it.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
Oh VMOON so TRUE!!! Amen sister, high fiving you across the pantry here!

Oh and I almost forgot because we live in a fire zone and have for decades, I keep 2 small suitcases (carry on size) packed at all times. Bug out bags in other words. So handy. Not just for potential fire evacuation either.

I always have some underwear and sox, plus a pair of black pants, a cream colour knit top that I can wash in a sink and wear almost right away and a thin black wool merino V neck sweater with a warm silk scarf and a pair of earrings. I have 2 nylon windbreaker jackets that fold into a mini pouch the size of a deck of cards. Some thin thermals can double as pajamas as well as adding extra warmth if it's cold --that is if you like pajamas.

Because we do travel a lot, I also keep a pair of flat "thong" type sandals, which take up almost no room, but it's protection for the feet on hotel floors, bathrooms, pool areas etc. And a spare swimsuit in a plastic zip lock bag (to wrap it back up wet if needed) so that if we are in a place with a pool, I'm prepared to enjoy myself.

Little things but they add up to the ability to rise above whatever emergency you are in. It's like my spare earrings and makeup. I feel better wearing them, so why not put them in my emergency kit? You never know when you might leave the house without your eyebrows on or your earrings!!!! Quel horreur! :p We ladies must be prepared!

So a change of clothes is near to hand if we suddenly leave due to evacuation or due to a sudden trip that comes up to see a relative in the Yukon, or in Vancouver etc. Or if I want to have these things on hand for a hospital stay-- which is coming up with George.

I keep a small minimal set of toiletries (face cream, shampoo I'm not allergic to, sunscreen, hand cream, hand sanitizer, toothpaste, deodorant etc) in there along with Shaving kit for G, a good hair dryer for me and brushes, combs, toothbrushes and so forth. My bare minimum cosmetics (eye brow pencil --a necessity!, some powder foundation, blush, mascara -another must! and lip balm and lipstick) None of these will overwhelm my TSA liquid allowance bag which I try to keep in mind because most of the time I use this kit, it's for a trip. It means I can be ready for stuff without feeling stressed.

A mini first aide kit, bandaids, polysporin, antacids, laxatives, painkillers, and even melatonin to help sleep when time changes or stress interfere. Ladylike necessities ditto. Under stress even monthly cycles do strange things. Again, I use some of these on our pleasure trips, but on emergency family visits, or heaven forfend an evacuation due to fire, such things keep you feeling "normal" when all round you it's going a bit crazy.

I keep a small address and phone number booklet in there because you never know if your iphone will die just as you need to call relatives and reassure them. In the meantime, that address book has come in SO handy for a quick look up of a cousin or an auntie's phone number or address.

Our passports and TSA precheck or in our case Nexxus cards because it saves frantic searching if we have a sudden air trip. PHONE CHARGER and ear buds. Always, a spare set, in that luggage always. I also keep my spare kindle charger in there too. Chargers are often forgotten in last minute packing.

AND for those moments when you can't bellow "SILENCE!!!!! TURN OUT ALL LIGHTS! AND NOW BEHAVE YOURSELVES PEOPLE --as I Queen of the situation --I AM TRYING TO SLEEP!!!!":groucho

---EAR PLUGS are such a blessing at such moments and also a nice silk sleeping mask. They've have been very helpful on many a stress filled trip and even some cruises. :D
 
Last edited:

sherryh

Well-Known Member
we had a dinner sampler night where each family member shared a dehydrated dinner meal just wanted to see which ones we liked, it was fun and we laughed a lot. many years ago would store MRE's but they got expensive and i know the hiker meals are pricey also but i like to keep some of that stuff on and as well. years ago my sister and i were walking out of the store and she was teasing me about buying a big can of powered eggs, but she had a carton of cigarettes, hum!
 

sherryh

Well-Known Member
If you live in California I would definitely stock antibacterial stuff. California is already having a health crisis. The homeless in San Francisco is worse than any 3rd world country. The hospitals and doctors are all saying that. There is feces and drug needles on the sidewalks and streets and what no news channel is telling you, their are dead bodies that can go undetected for days. The poop can have airborne bacteria, I wouldn't go their if I had to and that's why the city is offering just under 200 thousand a year for street and sidewalk sweepers and that means you walk the street you don't get a nice machine. Sorry hope I haven't said to much!
 

HeIsRisen

Well-Known Member
I am big on keeping things in stock that have a very long shelf life. I also shop the BOGO ads to keep a lot of my pantry stocked at half price, and as someone else said, then use them up knowing I paid half (or much less than full price) for them. The next time they go on sale, I load up again, so my pantry is always quite filled.

This year we had a stainless steel deep well high pressure hand pump installed, because we live out in the country and try as I might, I have never come to terms with not knowing how I would get water out of the ground in the event of a true crisis of any kind. It was extremely costly, around 3 thousand dollars, but now I know I can get water out of the ground by going out there and pressing that big ol' pump thingy down, and it goes down several hundred feet, and the handle glides like butter on corn. I also got two german shepherd puppies to ensure that pump stays put, lol. All are doing great! I used to keep plastic water bottles on hand, but they leak and fall apart at about the one year mark, so I determined this was a falable plan. Also, you can't store much water, not nearly what you need for longer term, so we would have had to leave our home over the issue of water in very short term in the event of any type of real emergency, and that is not something I was comfortable doing since I am disabled.

For those who can't get water, I own a few katadine water purifiers that purify 30k gallons of any kind of water (even scummy pond water, lol). These are not cheap, but food and water are non negotiable things when it comes to sustaining for any length of time.

I've seen a few pertinent scriptures posted, but here are a few more that suggests we need to be on point with this:
Proverbs 22: 3 , Proverbs 28:19, Proverbs 21:20 and Proverbs 6: 6-8

I do not prep anything like those people I see on television, but I do keep my pantries overflowing with sustainable food, and if I see a date coming up on my items, I will donate them. The funny thing is, I know enough paycheck to paycheck people that I don't even have to take my extras to the food banks. I just go to single moms with kids and they are overwhelmingly happy to take any extras I might have. So, I haven't thrown out anything, only shared with others, and been able to keep my pantry full. I accept that if I am going to have a lifestyle of being more or less prepared to hunker down in my house for several months to even a little longer, I will have to be responsible about stock rotation, so I am.
 

Lookingup83

Well-Known Member
I am one of those preppers lol. Mostly for the left behind but also for the random disaster that could happen. I live in an Rv so space is limited, I have to be crafty. Right now I'm sitting on 3 months of extra food/supplies. My goal is 1 year.
 

ReadyOrNot

Well-Known Member
I’m not much of a prepper but I do keep a lot of non-perishable food in the house. I did prep water for Y2K by rinsing out gallon milk jugs, filling with water and added 2-3 drops bleach for sanitation. I stored these in the basement. I kept them for a few years, but noticed at one point that they had degraded and sprung tiny pinhole leaks. Sheesh, what a mess. I won’t do that again!
 
Top