A Global Food Crisis is Coming

Endangered

Well-Known Member
I drove a diesel car for over a year. I paid $0.30 more per gallon than gas. Today that number is over a dollar a gallon.
Add to that the price of fertilizer which has zoomed and we definitely have a crisis looming.
I just may buy seed at Ace Hardware and grow my own veggies.
 

RobinB

Well-Known Member
Prophecy update blog?????? What is that?

That's the actual name of the website, the person who runs it compiles articles from many sources. Some of them show up here too.

prophecyupdate on Blogspot (not sure if I am allowed to post the actual link)
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I drove a diesel car for over a year. I paid $0.30 more per gallon than gas. Today that number is over a dollar a gallon.
Add to that the price of fertilizer which has zoomed and we definitely have a crisis looming.
I just may buy seed at Ace Hardware and grow my own veggies.
Gardening is fun. I used to do that before the move to our apartment.

Check into Square Foot Gardening (it's a thing) for an easy start to veggie gardening. The original book on it is now in it's 3rd edition. I used to have the first edition, and my daughter now does something like that on her farm.

The other thing is raised beds which combine with square foot gardening and make life simpler.

Weed control is easier. Once a space has been rototilled, you put down your planks or concrete blocks for the raised beds. Just something to contain the tilled soil. You can shovel in more soil from the paths to help fill them up. The idea is plenty of soft deep soil for the plants to set roots into easily, and water and air to pass down into.

Then I used to cover my garden spaces with cardboard or 6 to 8 layers of newspaper, wet that all down, and cover with mulch. I used "pins" that I made out of old wire hangers. Cut the wire into a U shape and hammer it down anywhere you want to hold that cardboard and paper from blowing away. Use whatever mulch you can.

Sawdust is ideal if you have access to it. That is what our daughter does. I used it too in my day. But bark mulch works too. Just something that will gradually melt into the soil and break down naturally. Straw has seeds so it's not great but Ruth Stout used it in her No Work Gardening Method (another book I used).

When sawdust or bark mulch or paper/cardboard break down, the soil bacteria use up nitrogen so you need to add some back to compensate. I sprinkle after planting, on top of all the mulch, and let watering work it's way down in a poor mans timed release fertilizer system.

Cut an X where you want to put a plant or a seed. Plant it.

I used a bulb planter to cut out and scoop up a cone of soil, then plant the tomato plant or other transplant. replace the soil, then pat the X flaps down next to the transplant. Or just plant your squash seed in the x. Look up bulb planters, and you'll see why using one makes transplanting easier.

Sprinkle some cheap10-10-10 fertilizer. It will act as a time release like I said above.

Keep it watered, and amble out before the heat of the day and pull any weeds that do make it thru all the mulch. As long as you keep going out every few days to weed, it'll stay nice.

I used to head out in my nightie with my morning coffee and commune with my garden. Plants don't require conversation, nor do they ask unnecessary questions before you have enough coffee in the system. Family keeps out of your way lest they be asked to do weeding with you. It's a win, win and WIN if you ask me.

No work with a hoe or a rake required. That soil stays nice and loose because you walk in the paths between the raised beds. I used to cover those with black plastic, and more of my home made U shaped wire pins. A little sawdust there too keeps it tidy.

I did this method in my flower beds, in previous houses. It works the exact same way. I could get several flats of petunias done and into the garden in a morning using my bulb planter and X cuts into the mulch method. I used an old knife to cut the X into the wet paper/cardboard.
 
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