A Geopolitical and Economic Crisis is on the Horizon

TrustinHim

Well-Known Member
There will be a housing crisis and all the satanists have been encouraging people to buy recently. In the UK we had the government introduce a stamp duty holiday; this encouraged so many people to buy. The market went insane.
The satanists knew this would happen. They want people in debt so that they can ensure more people are on state income and therefore compliant.
GGGRRRRR!!!!!
Huge debt load and then they crash the whole money system and everyone is ordered to submit to the global financial system and by the way there are a few strings attached.
 

TrustinHim

Well-Known Member
Tiny Houses, especially the nice ones, are expensive for what one gets, and getting more expensive every day. A travel trailer, unless purchased used, loses a lot of value very quickly, like buying a new versus a used car.
The shipping container houses like what I found when I searched for prefab cardboard houses :thankyou @JSTyler
weren't ridiculous. But probably need a lot of added insulation, etc. if I put one in northern Minnesota.
Maybe a sailboat? So no property taxes, free fuel (wind) and cruise down to Florida in the winter. A fixer upper perhaps ? But really it's a lot of hard work to maintain and docking fees etc. Then you have to learn lots of seafaring expressions, Yarrr.. oh wait that's pirate stuff.
 

Salluz

Aspiring Man of God
A giant paper sack :lol Or a giant paper sack with many rooms smaller sacks :lol

I wonder if the New Jerusalem will be euclidean space. The fact that we are given the dimensions makes me think yes, but it would also be really nifty to have some TARDIS style rooms that are larger on the outside than on the inside. Like maybe a wardrobe that takes you to a country full of talking animals....
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
I wonder if the New Jerusalem will be euclidean space. The fact that we are given the dimensions makes me think yes, but it would also be really nifty to have some TARDIS style rooms that are larger on the outside than on the inside. Like maybe a wardrobe that takes you to a country full of talking animals....
All around us and within us is the evidence of creative expression. Who knows? But if we can imagine now with such limited means of understanding eternity, and we know our Father gives excellent gifts and delights in our delight...well, not even the sky will be a limit. Imo anyway.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I wonder if the New Jerusalem will be euclidean space. The fact that we are given the dimensions makes me think yes, but it would also be really nifty to have some TARDIS style rooms that are larger on the outside than on the inside. Like maybe a wardrobe that takes you to a country full of talking animals....
Or the Guardian of Forever :rolleyes
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
My son moved to Colorado Springs last year. He couldn't find a decent place to live at a reasonable price so he looked to buy. He said homes were moving so fast that you really couldn't even take the time to go inspect it first. I told him that it's a really bad idea to buy a home without crawling around it first. He ended up purchasing a new home which is currently getting built... thankfully he locked in the price a few months ago. The price of the same house just a few months later is over 10% higher. Meanwhile he's surviving long term in an Air BnB room. The housing market is many communities has gone very crazy.
Not only is it imperative that you crawl around the house, I would HIGHLY recommend paying for a home inspection. If a licensed and bonded home inspector misses something, he has to pay for the repair. My first job with HUD (1979) was "appraiser". It was unreal how many houses I had to put on the "permanently uninsurable" list (for a HUD insured mortgage.) For about twenty friends, church members, and relatives I did unofficial home inspections. Under one house I found crisscrossed stacks of railroad ties used as piers (mortared masonry required for this type of foundation). Pure termite bait. Termites (mostly found in the south) can go from that wood, through the floor and walls, and all the way to the attic rafters. In another case I spotted several things that indicated rot. This young recently married couple really liked the looks of the house. I didn't say anything until we were back on the front porch. I glanced at wood rot on the base of a 4x4 porch roof support and said "Stand back". I kicked the support at its base, and the whole "column" swung into the shrubbery and twisted back and forth. I asked "How do you like it now?" They changed their mind.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Not only is it imperative that you crawl around the house, I would HIGHLY recommend paying for a home inspection. If a licensed and bonded home inspector misses something, he has to pay for the repair. My first job with HUD (1979) was "appraiser". It was unreal how many houses I had to put on the "permanently uninsurable" list (for a HUD insured mortgage.) For about twenty friends, church members, and relatives I did unofficial home inspections. Under one house I found crisscrossed stacks of railroad ties used as piers (mortared masonry required for this type of foundation). Pure termite bait. Termites (mostly found in the south) can go from that wood, through the floor and walls, and all the way to the attic rafters. In another case I spotted several things that indicated rot. This young recently married couple really liked the looks of the house. I didn't say anything until we were back on the front porch. I glanced at wood rot on the base of a 4x4 porch roof support and said "Stand back". I kicked the support at its base, and the whole "column" swung into the shrubbery and twisted back and forth. I asked "How do you like it now?" They changed their mind.

Everywhere we went we bought a house while in the military, and we crawled every house we looked at before making an offer, including the one new construction. Real estate agents hated us. Didn't care. It was our money, not theirs :tappingfoot They were going to make $$$ off the transaction, so those they should have been *nicer* about the whole thing. There were houses we liked, but too many/major things wrong/going wrong. Always did a VA Loan, so a VA inspector always came out before the loan was approved. In a couple of cases, the contract had to be modified and the seller had to do work that was inspected again, prior to loan approval and closing.

These days, I bet Military and Veterans trying to use VA Loans for houses in hot markets are getting shut out because of the extra time and steps needed for such loans :cry


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I wonder if the New Jerusalem will be euclidean space. The fact that we are given the dimensions makes me think yes, but it would also be really nifty to have some TARDIS style rooms that are larger on the outside than on the inside. Like maybe a wardrobe that takes you to a country full of talking animals....

(opened) paper sacks can change shape and volume . . . :lol
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
First, I'm not a financial prognosticator, just an observer. So this is all the opinion of a knucklehead in the end.

That said... My opinion is that the Trump years while great for some sectors of the financial world like the stock market, are just a facade over reality when you look at how the economic "gains" will certainly be offset by insurmountable debt to GDP ratios, and that's where the rub is. I don't think our brainless leaders grasp the concept that the interest alone on the debt accrued by ALL world economies (not just the US) is beyond the ability to be paid let alone retired. OR, as we've discussed on this board, they do understand and have been working towards this financial event horizon with diligence and purpose. "Welcome AC, so glad you're here to save us...hey wait, where'd all those troublesome Jesus freaks go?"

My understanding is that all value, all markets, all currency and commodities values really boils down to one simple factor, and that's consumer/customer perception. I think the vale has been pulled aside and the great reveal is that the king has no clothes. Our dollars, paper or digital essentially represent an illusion that has no ability to fool the masses any longer. And gold is just shiny, malleable metal that I can't eat.

Soooo, housing market in the US? No question, it's headed for a crash. The prices are far too inflated right now. It's so similar to the last crash and I firmly believe the economy local and world are on the brink.
For an "observer", those are insightful remarks. It's all about what people want (or can be persuaded to believe they want). But it gives me a chance to bash the mortgage industry and its backers FMMA and FHLMC, as well as investors like Goldman Sachs and their insurer AIG. A “subprime mortgage” is too easy to get. It was never illegal, but pressure to give everyone their “right” to a house (false - a house is not a right), mortgages approved by greedy lenders (origination fees) and backed by the government allowed many borrowers who DIDN'T EVEN HAVE A JOB to have a mortgage. Foreclosures increased - DUH! These flaky mortgages were bundled with other "investments" and the bundles were purchased by investors. When empty houses ruined entire neighborhoods (starting in the Southwest), the failed neighborhoods spread everywhere. No one wants to pay for a house in a big area of abandoned and poorly policed houses, so the housing market crash started (2007) and spread collapse to every single agency, investor, and INSURER I have named. The bundles would have collapsed completely solely due to their bad mortgages. To avoid a worldwide economic collapse, George Bush signed a huge bailout of EVERYTHING, including auto makers. Goldman Sachs was corrupt but was bailed out. Lehman Brothers (another investor) was allowed to fail. Politics. The final insurer for just about everything HAD to be bailed out so somebody could bail out all the other greedy crooks and idiots. But - who is the real final insurer? YOU ARE. The government's money came from taxpayers. From you who had a job to those folks without a job that "deserved" a house. As Clint Eastwood said in "Unforgiven", DESERVE'S GOT NOTHING TO DO WITH IT.
End of Chapter One. You are probably more than bored and disgusted than you ever thought possible, and it gets worse.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
For an "observer", those are insightful remarks. It's all about what people want (or can be persuaded to believe they want). But it gives me a chance to bash the mortgage industry and its backers FMMA and FHLMC, as well as investors like Goldman Sachs and their insurer AIG. A “subprime mortgage” is too easy to get. It was never illegal, but pressure to give everyone their “right” to a house (false - a house is not a right), mortgages approved by greedy lenders (origination fees) and backed by the government allowed many borrowers who DIDN'T EVEN HAVE A JOB to have a mortgage. Foreclosures increased - DUH! These flaky mortgages were bundled with other "investments" and the bundles were purchased by investors. When empty houses ruined entire neighborhoods (starting in the Southwest), the failed neighborhoods spread everywhere. No one wants to pay for a house in a big area of abandoned and poorly policed houses, so the housing market crash started (2007) and spread collapse to every single agency, investor, and INSURER I have named. The bundles would have collapsed completely solely due to their bad mortgages. To avoid a worldwide economic collapse, George Bush signed a huge bailout of EVERYTHING, including auto makers. Goldman Sachs was corrupt but was bailed out. Lehman Brothers (another investor) was allowed to fail. Politics. The final insurer for just about everything HAD to be bailed out so somebody could bail out all the other greedy crooks and idiots. But - who is the real final insurer? YOU ARE. The government's money came from taxpayers. From you who had a job to those folks without a job that "deserved" a house. As Clint Eastwood said in "Unforgiven", DESERVE'S GOT NOTHING TO DO WITH IT.
End of Chapter One. You are probably more than bored and disgusted than you ever thought possible, and it gets worse.

I've always thought if all that bailout money was used to refinance all the adjustable rate mortgages into fixed rate mortgages with payments people could afford, everyone could have been bailed out. The $$$ would have been necessary because a lot of those mortgages would have ended up 40 year or even longer terms, but everyone would have gotten their $$$ and people wouldn't have lost their houses, jobs, etc., etc., etc. And maybe there wouldn't have been a need for another bailout :tappingfoot

During the "pop" I watched a working class two-parent family with kids in a lousy "redlined" neighborhood both lose their low wage jobs, and the only reason they didn't lose their house was because unemployment plus social programs and the Church, plus everyone in the family did something to bring in income until employment could be obtained, including the kids. They paid the mortgage first, no matter how much that hurt, including no $$$ for utilities, food, etc. A lot of times, meals and bags of aluminum cans showed up on the doorstep, because neighbors knew and cared. The adjustable rate mortgages and insurance policies people in that area resorted to because of the area, crime rates, and the lower incomes were terrible. Good credit didn't help. Had people in poor areas had access to decent lending options, such as 30-year fixed rates, far fewer people would have lost their homes in poor areas. Unfortunately, there were people in the same area that did lose their homes. In a few cases, it was elderly, who simply couldn't manage the rising payments on fixed incomes. I could write all night about the people in the community in which I was an officer, and how they suffered at the hands of the mortgage and insurance industry :cry BTW, in that community, owning is cheaper than renting, even when Section 8 is considered, because of Section 8 minimum percent housing expenditure requirements :mad

Redlining is illegal, but mortgage and insurance industry found/has ways of doing it.

Cannot speak to more affluent/low crime areas, although bad credit will limit financing and insurance options in any price range. Especially if people have to take out private mortgage insurance (PMI) :mad
 

BlessedAssurance

Well-Known Member
Sorry to barge in here, but I've been meaning to ask a question relating to the talk of housing in this topic.

Many have talked about how if the economy crashed and people owed debt on their house, the government could decide to clear that debt BUT they would now own that house. ("Owe nothing and be happy" is their slogan.) What would happen for a person who has already paid off their house entirely and owes nothing? What about paid-off land?

This is just a curious question.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
I've always thought if all that bailout money was used to refinance all the adjustable rate mortgages into fixed rate mortgages with payments people could afford, everyone could have been bailed out. The $$$ would have been necessary because a lot of those mortgages would have ended up 40 year or even longer terms, but everyone would have gotten their $$$ and people wouldn't have lost their houses, jobs, etc., etc., etc. And maybe there wouldn't have been a need for another bailout :tappingfoot

During the "pop" I watched a working class two-parent family with kids in a lousy "redlined" neighborhood both lose their low wage jobs, and the only reason they didn't lose their house was because unemployment plus social programs and the Church, plus everyone in the family did something to bring in income until employment could be obtained, including the kids. They paid the mortgage first, no matter how much that hurt, including no $$$ for utilities, food, etc. A lot of times, meals and bags of aluminum cans showed up on the doorstep, because neighbors knew and cared. The adjustable rate mortgages and insurance policies people in that area resorted to because of the area, crime rates, and the lower incomes were terrible. Good credit didn't help. Had people in poor areas had access to decent lending options, such as 30-year fixed rates, far fewer people would have lost their homes in poor areas. Unfortunately, there were people in the same area that did lose their homes. In a few cases, it was elderly, who simply couldn't manage the rising payments on fixed incomes. I could write all night about the people in the community in which I was an officer, and how they suffered at the hands of the mortgage and insurance industry :cry BTW, in that community, owning is cheaper than renting, even when Section 8 is considered, because of Section 8 minimum percent housing expenditure requirements :mad

Redlining is illegal, but mortgage and insurance industry found/has ways of doing it.

Cannot speak to more affluent/low crime areas, although bad credit will limit financing and insurance options in any price range. Especially if people have to take out private mortgage insurance (PMI) :mad
Adjustable Rate Mortgages - another disaster. The homeowners were betting interest rates stayed low. But if they went up (they did), their payments rose accordingly. I'm anti-gambling. People bet their homes and lost. A tragic poker game from a shallow movie.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
Sorry to barge in here, but I've been meaning to ask a question relating to the talk of housing in this topic.

Many have talked about how if the economy crashed and people owed debt on their house, the government could decide to clear that debt BUT they would now own that house. ("Owe nothing and be happy" is their slogan.) What would happen for a person who has already paid off their house entirely and owes nothing? What about paid-off land?

This is just a curious question.
"Barging in" is exactly what is needed in this painful autopsy. Remember when a father who had slaved to pay his daughter's tuition confronted Elizabeth Warren about her plan to cancel all college loan debt? I won't use the word he used but it's the vulgar form of "cheated". She quickly dismissed his logic with low-quality jibberish - this from a woman (sorry, I mean a person who is of the female gender) who identified as "American Native" on her college entrance application.
Anything you own outright cannot be taken until Communism is the law and the government owns everything. Any scheme in which the government owns your house because they paid off your mortgage will evolve into the state allocating part or all of THEIR house to those in need of emergency housing. Private ownership of property is a hallmark of capitalism. Or folks can believe:
I'm from your government and I'm here to help you.
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
Considering selling my farm to a cousin who been wanting it for years. I will still live there for as long as I want. I was debating back and forth. He asked wouldn’t I rather have money in the bank? I told him the farm can produce food whether garden or hunting rabbits or squirrels if come down to that. He is a Vice President of a bank and his wife a bank auditor. They seem oblivious to what is going on in the world and not sure they believe in the rapture though I’ve mentioned it a few times in past. So planning to owner finance to keep any financial institution out of it. Praying that will be the thing to do.
 

Salluz

Aspiring Man of God
Barging in" is exactly what is needed in this painful autopsy. Remember when a father who had slaved to pay his daughter's tuition confronted Elizabeth Warren about her plan to cancel all college loan debt? I won't use the word he used but it's the vulgar form of "cheated". She quickly dismissed his logic with low-quality jibberish

I think there is a solid biblical precedent for debt cancellation being moral and prudent. God instructed everyone in Israel to cancel their debts both public and private every sabbath year, and forgiving debt is constantly referenced as a good thing in the new testament, heavily associated with forgiving sin.

The attitude of being upset because you put effort in to get rid of your own debt only for others to have theirs forgiven reminds me of the parable of the vineyard workers in Matt. 20

9 “The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’ 13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’ 16 “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

I know that isn't very republican of me, but I would like to think I don't base my theology off of my politics, but the other way around

That's not to say you do base your theology on politics, just to clarify.. I've just been wanting to examine my own beliefs and make sure they're biblical and not cultural or political
 
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Footsteps

Well-Known Member
I think there is a solid biblical precedent for debt cancellation being moral and prudent. God instructed everyone in Israel to cancel their debts both public and private every sabbath year, and forgiving debt is constantly referenced as a good thing in the new testament, heavily associated with forgiving sin.

The attitude of being upset because you put effort in to get rid of your own debt only for others to have theirs forgiven reminds me of the parable of the vineyard workers in Matt. 20

9 “The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’ 13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’ 16 “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

I know that isn't very republican of me, but I would like to think I don't base my theology off of my politics, but the other way around

That's not to say you do base your theology on politics, just to clarify.. I've just been wanting to examine my own beliefs and make sure they're biblical and not cultural or political
If government and economists based their programs on the Bible, there would be no issues like we see now. Every 50 years was a Jubilee Year - all debts were cancelled and property returned to its original owner. Our way of “debt cancellation” does not do away with debt- it only transfers it from one person and it is ultimately paid by some institution which drives up prices for the next customers - or paid by taxpayers. God's way broke up long-term out of control debt that He knew would be subject to greed-based Ponzi schemes by Republicans, Democrats, moneylenders, "investors", and insolvent "insurers" of man made schemes. When our Constitutional Convention met, they made no law for which they could not find a Bible basis. You know how much God's instructions are used now. In fact, God's ideas are actively fought against. Karl Marx hated God and now we see the results.
"The borrower is the servant of the lender" is true for nations as well as individuals. Boy is that obvious in our time. My biggest disappointment in politics as related to economics: George Bush. He spent and borrowed to the extreme although he had inherited a BUDGET IN THE BLACK FROM BILL CLINTON.
I agree it was pointless for the father to confront Warren. He seemed to be motivated only by the same emotions the older brother was, as you have said. If I could confront a Warren, I would ask her "You do know the debt would not be wiped out, only transferred, right?"
Before the government took over charity, Christian churches dealt with it to the extent possible and still try. But the churches know "the poor ye have always with thee". Politicians believe their "war on poverty" will eliminate poverty in total. The fact is we have more poverty when government tries to eliminate it. And as to the Founding Fathers, they limited the number of laws to the extent possible. Now we have countless laws, and more lawlessness than ever.
 
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