7 Reasons You Should Quit Facebook

RoseWood

Well-Known Member
7 Reasons You Should Quit Facebook


Quit Facebook
By Matthew Kitchen

Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
Ten years ago Facebook was just cresting as the cool new social media site that helped you keep in touch with the people you didn’t actually like in high school. We fed it our thoughts and feelings, shared our meals and locations and our top ten movie lists, kept it up-to-date on our relationship status, political views, favorite links, and personal information — all in the name of staying connected, and all without a thought to our security. But with a decade of questions regarding how Facebook makes money now answered, and a general understanding of how sharing information online can be dangerous (while the platform constantly updates its security protocol), we continue to use it anyway, even though many of us are just checking in as ritual and have threatened our exit from Facebook for years.

Of course, screen time in moderation is, for the most part, perfectly acceptable, and social media can offer a few genuinely beneficial uses. But before you log in or tap that app on your smartphone again, here are a few reasons to quit Facebook in 2015.


It Wastes Your Time
It's estimated that the average casual user (17 minutes per day on Facebook) who has been active on the site for 10 years has wasted upwards of 40 entire days of their lives scrolling and liking and commenting on pictures and posts. And more engaged users, who spend at least an hour a day on the site, have clocked 150 days feeding the Facebook beast during the same time. Think about how long you spend on the site each day, and what else could be a more productive use of your time.

Facebook Uses You to Sell Stuff...
In 2012, the site manipulated posts from 689,000 accounts without consent in an experiment that examined whether or not it could affect your emotions by making a few edits on your page. The study was done, according to Facebook, to "improve our services and to make the content people see on Facebook as relevant and engaging as possible." Skeptics think it was really used to discover the monetary benefit of a Like. COO Sheryl Sandberg later apologized, adding that they "never meant to upset you."

Read more...

http://www.mensjournal.com/gear/collection/why-were-getting-off-facebook-in-2015-20141231?utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=zergnet_934766
 

Len

Well-Known Member
The flip side of the story is that you can touch lives with the Bible on Facebook still.
I agree that Facebook though a time waster (I have plenty of time) gives me the opportunity to post Pro Christian messages to at least 1400(going up) non christian people on a regular basis with a few "likes" from those non christian people, that means they have read that scripture verse I posted, though some even go on and reply with a jibe or nasty quip but I always reply; and then there is also those "christians by name" that are reading RF messages of imminency or other interesting topics and to see their "likes" is just as encouraging ...... Praise God in His glory!
 
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Ready 2 Fly

...and soar on eagles wings
I'm in my mid thirties and I quit facebook when I was 29. Yes it is a tool to help spread the gospel but, I personally found that it's also incredibly hard because everyone wants to chime in with their idiotic opinions. I just felt like it wasn't worth it because if I know that person personally then I can just contact them directly. Plus Christians have spread the gospel for thousands of years without facebook. I think we'll do just fine now without it as well. My friends try to convince me to go back too but I'm happier without it.
 

RoseWood

Well-Known Member
The flip side of the story is that you can touch lives with the Bible on Facebook still.
An article by Todd Starnes

My conservative page got blocked by Facebook

By Todd Starnes
Published May 16, 2016

I am the bad boy of Facebook.

I earned that badge of honor back in 2013 when Facebook blocked my page and removed a message I had posted that invoked Paula Deen, the National Rifle Association and Jesus Christ. Here’s what I wrote:

"I'm about as politically incorrect as you can get. I'm wearing an NRA ball cap, eating a Chick-fil-A sandwich, reading a Paula Deen cookbook and sipping a 20-ounce sweet tea while sitting in my Cracker Barrel rocking chair with the Gaither Vocal Band singing 'Jesus Saves' on the stereo and a Gideon's Bible in my pocket. Yes sir, I'm politically incorrect and happy as a June bug."

The folks over at Facebook took great offense to that message.

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"We removed this from Facebook because it violates our Community Standards," Facebook wrote me. "So you're temporarily blocked from using this feature."


I wasn't even allowed to post our daily Bible verse -- a popular feature called "Morning Glory -- Start Your Day Inspired."


Facebook Inc. (FB) | FindTheCompany
For the record, I really do have a Cracker Barrel rocking chair, I'm quite fond of sweet tea, I love Chick-fil-A, I'm a huge fan of Southern Gospel music, I own several Paula Deen cookbooks and I'm a proud member of the National Rifle Association.

Does that make me a bad person?

I was genuinely perplexed by Facebook's censors – befuddled even.

So I decided to investigate Facebook's community standards – which at best – are rather vague. Among its commandments were bans on nudity, bullying, harassment, graphic content, pornography and spam.

For the record, I require all of our followers to wear pants and Miss Paula was not doing anything unladylike with a stick of butter.

It is true that one of my daily postings included some spam – a delicious recipe for a fried spam sandwich.

It's even more puzzling that they would target a patriotic, conservative website like mine when they allow a host of vulgar, violent and pornographic sites to stay in business.

Among the sites I found just this morning:

“F*** Donald Trump”

“F*** Sarah Palin Hoe A** B****

“Tea Party Can Kiss My A**”

“Rush Limbaugh is an Abject A******”

Had I been reading Saul Alinsky's “Rules For Radicals,” wearing a Planned Parenthood ball cap and smoking a joint, Facebook would've left me alone.

Facebook's decision to block me generated quite a bit of outrage. Don't choke on your Fruit Loops, but even the folks over at The Washington Post came to my defense.

And a few hours after banning me, Facebook had a change of heart.

"A member of our team accidentally removed something you posted on Facebook," they told me in an email. "This was a mistake and we sincerely apologize for this error."

Since that fateful day, I’ve noticed that my page has been subjected to random censorship by the Facebook gods. I’ve received dozens of complaints from readers who tell me my content no longer appears on their pages. In some cases, Facebook won’t allow them to share my postings.

And I’ve lost count of the number of fellow conservative writers whose pages have been blocked, banned or censored.

So I wasn’t all that surprised when a group of former Facebook workers told the tech news website Gizmodo that they put a liberal spin on “Trending Topics” – and routinely censored conservative news.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg strongly denied the allegations.

“Facebook stands for giving everyone a voice,” he wrote in a Facebook posting. “We believe the world is better when people from different backgrounds and with different ideas all have the power to share their thoughts and experiences. That’s what makes social media unique.”

Mr. Zuckerberg has agreed to meet with some conservative newsmakers later this week to address the allegations that Facebook suppressed conservative content.

“The reason I care so much about this is that it gets to the core of everything Facebook is and everything I want it to be,” he wrote. “Every tool we build is designed to give more people a voice and bring our global community together. For as long as I'm leading this company this will always be our mission.”

I really want to believe that Mr. Zuckerberg’s social networking platform is a place where anyone can share anything –a place that gives people a voice -- including people who ascribe to traditional American values.

Because any community that frowns upon the Good Book and sweet tea is a community that violates my personal standards.


Todd Starnes is host of Fox News & Commentary, heard on hundreds of radio stations. His latest book is "God Less America: Real Stories From the Front Lines of the Attack on Traditional Values." Follow Todd on Twitter@ToddStarnes and find him on Facebook.
 

BarbT

Well-Known Member
The Net is a huge mission field where millions of lost and hurting people hang out. Instead of handing out paper tracts we Christians can now deliver electronic ones.:bible

As a Christian, I don't expect to feel comfortable, safe, or popular in secular settings when witnessing. If the reaction to the Gospel is unpleasant from unsaved friends and family in person :sad, it's going to be doubly hostile on internet sites/social media where anonymity makes it easy for people to say vile things. I know it's a war zone going in.

With an interest in politics I find myself drawn to the Facebook pages of candidates, various media personalities and pundits. In many discussions I've had opportunities to segue the topic into last days prophecy and/or the plan of salvation through Christ. Just recently, following a news article about the Dalai Lama, most posters were praising him as "wise and holy", "the man we should follow" etc. In response, I wrote of the Savior's plan of salvation and encouraged readers to seek the Living God through Jesus, not a human man who cannot even save himself.

Of course many will hate what I wrote but it gives me joy to know they cannot "unread" the Truth once they see it.:) Satan is heavy in the mix at this point, so it's important to never argue with the haters but leave the outcome to God. He alone knows which person will or will not respond to the seeds planted.
 

Hol

Worships Him
With an interest in politics I find myself drawn to the Facebook pages of candidates, various media personalities and pundits. In many discussions I've had opportunities to segue the topic into last days prophecy and/or the plan of salvation through Christ. Just recently, following a news article about the Dalai Lama, most posters were praising him as "wise and holy", "the man we should follow" etc. In response, I wrote of the Savior's plan of salvation and encouraged readers to seek the Living God through Jesus, not a human man who cannot even save himself.

Of course many will hate what I wrote but it gives me joy to know they cannot "unread" the Truth once they see it.:) It's important to never argue with the haters but leave the outcome to God. He alone knows which person will or will not respond to the seeds planted.
Excellent Barb! Thanks for sharing.

I'll probably never get as hated as Todd Starnes, but I am encouraged that seeds are getting planted.

:thankyou
 

SonSeeker

Well-Known Member
Facebook stands for giving everyone a voice,” he wrote in a Facebook posting. “We believe the world is better when people from different backgrounds and with different ideas all have the power to share their thoughts and experiences. That’s what makes social media unique.”

Mr. Zuckerberg has agreed to meet with some conservative newsmakers later this week to address the allegations that Facebook suppressed conservative content.

“The reason I care so much about this is that it gets to the core of everything Facebook is and everything I want it to be,” he wrote. “Every tool we build is designed to give more people a voice and bring our global community together. For as long as I'm leading this company this will always be our mission.”

I really want to believe that Mr. Zuckerberg’s social networking platform is a place where anyone can share anything –a place that gives people a voice -- including people who ascribe to traditional American values.
FB is all about money, pure and simple. Zuckerberg wants to "give everyone a voice". Of course he does, it's all about numbers. The more clicks, etc. they get on their website, means that more people's eyes are glued to it. Which means more sponsors are wanting to advertise on the site, which means the more FB can charge for the privilege, which means there's more money in Zuckerberg's pocket.

Here's a thought:

In the not too distant future, a couple of guys could be killed and everybody can feast their eyes on the dead corpses for three and a half days, all without leaving their beloved Facebook, then they can talk to all their friends about it right there on FB. They'll be so excited, laughing and partying on-line they'll see a link to Amazon on the same page and they'll send gifts and such to each other and pay for it with their good buddy, Paypal. Oh, won't life be grand! Can't you just see Zuck salivating over the thought?

Facebook? No thanks!
 

RoseWood

Well-Known Member
FB is all about money, pure and simple. Zuckerberg wants to "give everyone a voice". Of course he does, it's all about numbers. The more clicks, etc. they get on their website, means that more people's eyes are glued to it. Which means more sponsors are wanting to advertise on the site, which means the more FB can charge for the privilege, which means there's more money in Zuckerberg's pocket.

Here's a thought:

In the not too distant future, a couple of guys could be killed and everybody can feast their eyes on the dead corpses for three and a half days, all without leaving their beloved Facebook, then they can talk to all their friends about it right there on FB. They'll be so excited, laughing and partying on-line they'll see a link to Amazon on the same page and they'll send gifts and such to each other and pay for it with their good buddy, Paypal. Oh, won't life be grand! Can't you just see Zuck salivating over the thought?

Facebook? No thanks!
Thank you!
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
One of the things facebook doesn't tell you, well they do in the fine print, is that they go through your email address book and send out letters to everyone in the address book that you are inviting them to join you in facebook.
 

Koalie

Well-Known Member
I was happy to leave fakebook behind 5 years ago.

I do have an Instagram that I check once a week though just because I love photography and it's a way for family and friends to still 'see' each other. Plus I love looking at the pictures of my kiddos from when they were little.
 

BarbT

Well-Known Member
:) Here it is 2018 and Christians are still piercing the darkness on various social media platforms. I see it every day. :sermon

If you are led to bring a biblical perspective to FB and Twitter conversations, don't be discouraged or intimidated by the roadblocks secular forces keep setting up to keep you out. The Lord will continue to blaze a path forward into these ripe mission fields until HE -- not the puny Zuckerbergs of this world -- decides that our work there is done. :armor
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
I opened a FB account one year ago in order to join a private group that deals with people who have cognitive issues. We all post encouragement to each other and share new information.

I only have one friend on FB, as I dont post in anything else. I dont even use my full name so old friends cant look me up.

For me, its very useful but only in my limited involvement.
 
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Len

Well-Known Member
more and more I started to use facebook as a christian medium, 3 or more posts are pictures of motorcycles, 3 posts are christian verses, some posts are israel or world news items and full articles from RF on all sorts of topics and to my suprise I have gained more than 1000 friend requests over the past year and most are non believers and even a number 1% motorcyclists(outlaws) and I get likes from these people on the christian posts! and that just amazes me ..... so even if only one seed got planted I am happy, but I see more that this happening, so for me I thank God that He allows me this outlet
 
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