5 Things Pastors Need to Stop Doing Immediately

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
5 Things Pastors Need to Stop Doing Immediately
By Shane Idleman

Pastors, we are not just cheerleaders, we are game changers. We are called to stir and to convict so that change takes place.

Granted, while there are many wonderful pastors and churches (that I appreciate), as a whole, the Church has drifted off course. They have lost the compass of truth. Many are more concerned about wine tasting and craft beers than truly seeking the heart of God.

The pulpit regulates the spiritual condition of God’s people which affects the nation. A lukewarm, sex-saturated culture (and Church) simply reflects the lack of conviction in the pulpit as well as the pew.

Pastors, and Christian leaders alike must take responsibility for the spiritual health of today’s Church, and the nation. We don’t need more marketing plans, demographic studies, or giving campaigns; we need men filled with the Spirit of God.

This is not a letter of rebuke (I’m in no position to do that). Rather it’s a tear-stained plea that we once again seek the heart of God. Here are five issues we need to overcome.

1. Stop Watering Down the Gospel

The truth is often watered-down in the hope of not offending members and building a large audience. Judgment is never mentioned and repentance is rarely sought.

We want to build a church rather than break a heart, be politically correct rather than biblically correct, and coddle and comfort rather than stir and convict. The power of the gospel is found in the truth of the gospel. The edited version does not change lives.

2. Stop Focusing Only on Encouragement

We all need encouragement, that’s a given, but most people feel beaten down because they’re not hearing more about repentance. “Repent and experience times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord” (cf.Acts 3:19).

To truly help people, we must preach the difficult truths as well as the joyful ones, preach the cross and the new life, preach hell and preach heaven, preach damnation and preach salvation, preach sin and preach grace, preach wrath and preach love, preach judgment and preach mercy, preach obedience and preach forgiveness, preach that God “is love,” but not forget that God is just.

It is the love of God that compels us to share all of His truth.

3. Stop Getting Your Message from Pop Psychology or the Latest Fad

All of us must return to the prayer closet where brokenness, humility, and full surrender take place. God prepares the messenger before we prepare the message. Without prayer, “the church becomes a graveyard, not an embattled army. Praise and prayer are stifled; worship is dead. The preacher and the preaching encourage sin, not holiness…preaching which kills is prayerless preaching. Without prayer, the preacher creates death, and not life” (E.M. Bounds). “Without the heartbeat of prayer, the body of Christ will resemble a corpse. The church is dying on her feet because she is not living on her knees” (Al Whittinghill).

4. Stop Trying to be Like the World

If a pastor fills his mind with the world all week and expects the Spirit of God to speak boldly through him from the pulpit, he will be gravely mistaken. Who he is all week is who he will be when he steps to the pulpit.

“The sermon cannot rise in its life-giving forces above the man. Dead men give out dead sermons, and dead sermons kill. Everything depends on the spiritual character of the preacher” (E.M. Bounds).

We are called to the separated life guided by the Holy Spirit not Hollywood.

When God brings change, separation and prayer has been the catalyst. The dry, dead lethargic condition of the church simply reflects our lack of being filled with the Spirit.

While 5-minute devotionals and prayers are good, they aren’t going to cut it in these dire times. We need powerful times of prayer, devotion, and worship.

Again, God prepares the messenger before we prepare the message. It takes broken men to break men. Unplug the TV, turn off Facebook, and get back into the Word, prayer, and worship.

5. Stop Asking, “Will this topic offend my audience?”

Instead, pastors should start asking, “Will my silence offend God?”

A paraphrase that is often attributed to Alexis De Tocqueville—a Frenchman who authored Democracy in America in the early 1800s—helps to better understand this point:

“I looked throughout America to find where her greatness originated. I looked for it in her harbors and on her shorelines, in her fertile fields and boundless prairies, and in her gold mines and vast world commerce, but it was not there…It was not until I went to the churches of America and heard her pulpits aflame with righteousness did I understand the secret of her success. America is great because she is good, and if America ceases to be good, America will cease to be great.”

Is your pulpit aflame with righteousness? It all begins here.

https://www.raptureforums.com/defending-the-faith/5-things-pastors-need-to-stop-doing-immediately/
 

Endangered

Well-Known Member
I feel like a good sermon should make you squirm a little. None of us are perfect and I think it is a pastor's responsibilty to point out our flaws.
A neighbor of mine attends a liberal church and the message every Sunday is pure feel good. No squirm, no self examination, no trying to live better. Just feel good about yourself.
 

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
I feel like a good sermon should make you squirm a little. None of us are perfect and I think it is a pastor's responsibilty to point out our flaws.
A neighbor of mine attends a liberal church and the message every Sunday is pure feel good. No squirm, no self examination, no trying to live better. Just feel good about yourself.
Sounds like most of the sermons on Sundays these days. :sad
 

Sojourner414

Well-Known Member
When people "water down" something, it's usually because there isn't enough of it, or it's too strong for whomever is receiving it.

That said: in the case of the former, the pastor "watering it down" needs to go refill in full from the fount where the Gospel came from: Jesus Christ. In the case of the latter: they need a good strong dose of the truth, because Hell CANNOT be diluted.
 

maranatha14

Well-Known Member
It has been said, "the church is about 30 years behind the world", meaning it is accepting now what it would have NEVER accepted 30 years ago. Be it for higher numbers or acceptability, it is wrong.

Our God never changes. His Word says what it says and means what it says. That is why it is so important to always refer back to only the Bible. And not a modern day version of the Bible that waters down the message.
 

lismore

Well-Known Member
False doctrines seems to feed off one another. When a church does not believe God still has plans for Israel they miss many of the prophecies in the bible and cannot see that the return of the Lord is very soon. So not believing the Lord is returning anytime soon they get into life coaching, avoiding 'controversial' doctrines and seek ways to be more worldly successful, believing they have all the time in the world. Making people on the broad road to destruction more comfortable in their descent to hell. Eventually they're so far from the truth one wonders if they're in the same faith.

On the other hand those who see the Fig Tree Blossom, who know it means the Lord is on the way, we're living in the light of his coming Kingdom knowing that this world is not our home, He has prepared a wonderful mansion for us! Controversial doctrines, bring them on! Trying to save as many souls possible, come join us on the narrow path to life. The Lord's imminent return and the shortness of time motivates us :amen
 

InMidian

Well-Known Member
Even though I belong to a Bible believing church, my pastor seems to focus on making us better Christians and outreach. Don't get me wrong, reaching the lost is very important, but I think we need to be better prepared for the coming persecution, ie: girding our loins, per se, so we're able to perservere and be more effective for God's kingdom. Our sermons seem to be on safe subjects, such as a 6 month message series on James. I guess I'm needing to feel that finger pointed at me so I can repent.
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
Even though I belong to a Bible believing church, my pastor seems to focus on making us better Christians and outreach. Don't get me wrong, reaching the lost is very important, but I think we need to be better prepared for the coming persecution, ie: girding our loins, per se, so we're able to perservere and be more effective for God's kingdom.
Better Christians are made/forged through the Word of God and that alone. Everything else is personality and program. If a pastor wants the sheep he's sheep-dog over, to be better he needs to fill them up to overflowing with Scripture.
Our sermons seem to be on safe subjects, such as a 6 month message series on James. I guess I'm needing to feel that finger pointed at me so I can repent.
We were in the same boat a couple years ago. It took a tragedy to wake us up and get us to pay real attention to the watered down drivel that we were soaking in for years. The dilution was slow and subtle. Our pastor had the knowledge and ability to unpack God's word, he simply decided to go easy on everything, ya' know. to "reach the lost". What happened is that he lost the reached and they stopped trying to reproduce. We were foolish for allowing it to happen.

It's so easy to forget that God has no grand children.
 
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