11-year-old boy dies after shooting himself during Zoom class

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
sorry I must disagree with you. My son, under age 15, attempted 3 times during lockdown. His mental stability is out of sync and he was unsure how to handle everything. He did have factors before hand, was hospitalized in Jan, but the lockdown made it all worse. I thank God for the information we were given at the hospital and were able to get him into extensive therapy so he is slowly getting better. We are lucky enough to be in a school that is In Person and has been since Aug. My kids, especially my son, needs to be in school. I believe that many to most other kids need to as well.

I also talked to a friend of ours who is a police of a metro area and he said that the suicide rates are much higher during the lockdown. I have said since the beginning that we didnt really see Jesus alone very much. I dont believe its the way God intended it. While I understand it early on, but the lagging on for months is what really screwed everything up. Its sad really.

As for the OP, I am so sad for this boys family. I wish more people would realize that this isn't good for kids.

Im so sorry! That must have been horrifying. I’m glad he’s getting the help he needs.
 

Moonlight

Thoroughly depressed and waiting for the trumpet
I would have loved it too... but this is just horrible. :oops: :( :confused: o_O
Yeah, different people may like or dislike remote learning. Everyone’s got their own situation which may be better or worse with it. However, now the great majority of students are having to learn remotely regardless of their preferences and situation.

When my Fall semester of college started this past September all the classes were online. I loved being on campus as a commuter to do my schoolwork, but all-online classes is one factor that pushed me to cancel all my classes for the Fall.
 

NavyMom

Well-Known Member
No one is killing themselves because of lockdowns.
I 100% disagree with you.
Although my 14-year-old daughter has not been suicidal, she has cried and cried throughout this entire ordeal. I have watched her happiness slowly fade away. She is a social butterfly and needs to be around her friends, in person. Thankfully, her school is in-person 5 days a week, but when I was sick with COVID a few weeks ago and then another classmate also became sick, my daughter's quarantine doubled, which sent her down the tunnel of sadness all over again.

Humans were not made to alone.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
No one is killing themselves because of lockdowns.

Huh? I think you might want to explain that with a bit more detail. But, even if what you really meant is "there are deeper issues involved", it would be hard to argue that social isolation and economic hardship hasn't exacerbated those "deeper issues". It has certainly manifested in lots of other problem areas, such as: increased drug/alcohol abuse, rising divorce rates, declining birth rates, over-eating, poor sleep habits, etc. It's not hard to imagine why those without a proper spiritual grounding (and even many with) would struggle during these times.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
One silver lining to all this is introverts, who often struggle with social *norms* of *too much* expected/demanded interaction, can likely thrive with the social distancing and online mandates.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Another silver lining is churches have improved technological skills and capabilities, which have improved outreach and facilitated The Great Commission :bouncies
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
I hated school. I would have loved to just stay at home and learn remotely. But times were different back then and I'm sure my education would have suffered as well as social skills.
I don’t think it’s so much that kids want to go to school, most don’t. It’s their peers that they like about school. Socializing with their friends is important to them because they can connect with one another, makes each other laugh, divert from stressful things, and youth do have stress through to adults it may seem silly but serious to them. Their friends help them escape all that. It’s hard on the kids if they aren’t socializing.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
My grandson is 12. I worry about him because he never says anything. He never complains about anything. He’s the youngest of three. His siblings are both in their twenties. They don’t have anything in common of interests and rarely even carry conversation with one another. His time away from the laptop school time is on his phone on YouTube or watching tv. He has been out of in person school s inception April when California had its first lockdowns. His siblings come and go as they please in their cars. Mom and dad do the same. Michael is always in the house, and doesn’t even go outside to play. Play what? Today’s kids don’t know how to play outside like many of us older ones did as kids. My grandson wouldn’t know about treehouses, forts, and slip n slide if I didn’t tell him about them. Sad.
The Governor won’t even give an estimated date to reopen schools here. Just know that they won’t be open until “at least 2021”. I think what has me worried about Michael is how he doesn’t even complain about being alone and not seeing his friends. But it shows in his expression that he’s sad and depressed. I pray this is all over soon because this is so hard on the kids. Sad for anyone losing a child this way. Tragic
 

LibertyBelle

Cracked.
Huh? I think you might want to explain that with a bit more detail. But, even if what you really meant is "there are deeper issues involved", it would be hard to argue that social isolation and economic hardship hasn't exacerbated those "deeper issues". It has certainly manifested in lots of other problem areas, such as: increased drug/alcohol abuse, rising divorce rates, declining birth rates, over-eating, poor sleep habits, etc. It's not hard to imagine why those without a proper spiritual grounding (and even many with) would struggle during these times.


Yes. There are many, deeper elements involved, which is what I meant. Isolation can certainly exasperate other issues, but it, in and of itself, is not responsible for people killing themselves.

I used to catch rollover calls for a (government) Mental Health Emergency Services Hotline. I have talked guns off people's heads.

Suicide is largely a spiritual attack. Not saying there are not other mental illness elements, and certainly not saying that all mental illnesses are 'demon possessions'. I used to believe that. I learned otherwise.

And yes - even with a strong "spiritual grounding", when that thing shows up in the room w/ you.... it's hard to resist. Very hard. I cannot fathom what it is to face that w/o Christ. The fact that any unsaved person is able to defeat it, is solely an act of His intervention.

I used to believe that people who committed suicide were just 'selfish', and weak. When I experienced what I believe to be the thing that pushes people to do that, it utterly changed my understanding of the issue.

But lockdowns are not causing people to kill themselves. If anything, it's forcing people to be still, and they can't deal w/ what is in the stillness.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
Yes. There are many, deeper elements involved, which is what I meant. Isolation can certainly exasperate other issues, but it, in and of itself, is not responsible for people killing themselves.

I used to catch rollover calls for a (government) Mental Health Emergency Services Hotline. I have talked guns off people's heads.

Suicide is largely a spiritual attack. Not saying there are not other mental illness elements, and certainly not saying that all mental illnesses are 'demon possessions'. I used to believe that. I learned otherwise.

And yes - even with a strong "spiritual grounding", when that thing shows up in the room w/ you.... it's hard to resist. Very hard. I cannot fathom what it is to face that w/o Christ. The fact that any unsaved person is able to defeat it, is solely an act of His intervention.

I used to believe that people who committed suicide were just 'selfish', and weak. When I experienced what I believe to be the thing that pushes people to do that, it utterly changed my understanding of the issue.

But lockdowns are not causing people to kill themselves. If anything, it's forcing people to be still, and they can't deal w/ what is in the stillness.
Well, that is a pretty important (necessary) caveat to your earlier statement, don't ya think? ;) FWIW, I actually agree with your basic (and, it seems, qualified) assessment...moreover, I'd actually hoped that was your point. I do appreciate that insight, btw.

But, here's the rub: the lockdowns are still the proximate cause of all sorts of personal crises, not least of which (in my view) will include the extra 130 million people expected to be starving this year (globally), which (in turn) would be expected produce an extra 30+ million starvation deaths this year. I'm sure most nearly all of them won't be spiritually prepared for this hardship either.

I'm sympathetic to your (implied) distinction: suicides are, by definition, self-inflicted harm, against which some manner of spiritual fortitude might be expected to lend protection. This too: I'm confident that the majority of American parents haven't actually, usefully, prepared their children for any kind of hardship (much beyond not getting pizza 7-nights-a-week, or whatever). And, for sure, they (the parents) would share some significant share of culpability, beyond the proximate cause of the lockdown (or having to eat vegetables once in a while).

I certainly hope lots of folks take this as a wake-up call. Still, I'm reminded that "the Lord tarrying" today is today's opportunity to rectify the spiritual problem of any unbeliever.
 

Mama Bug

Well-Known Member
I was one of those parents who was scared of sending my kids back to school in person. But a big part of why my husband and I did choose to send them back was their wishes to be with their friends. The only real advantages I could see in virtual school were not having to get up early, not fighting traffic, and not having to worry as much about the virus. But the disadvantages outweighed the advantages. The program used for the high school isn't good according to my daughter. She is a straight A student but really struggled the first few weeks with virtual learning. She learns better in a traditional classroom. My son did fine but I worried that it wasn't challenging enough. He's elementary aged so it was a different program. Our district started out having kids do traditional two days and online three days, then opened up fully a month later. They still hate school but they are doing well emotionally and getting a better education than they would have virtually. Not to say that they wouldn't do well in a homeschool program. Virtual public school and homeschool seem to be two different things though. My cousin home schools her kids and they are thriving. They also still get to interact with their peers. I didn't want anyone to think that I'm knocking homeschool. I'm not at all. But I am hearing that a lot of kids are not doing well in virtual, where they'd be doing fine in a traditional classroom or in an actual homeschool program. Kids need to be with their friends somehow. If not in school, then play dates or whatever you want to call them need to be set up. They absolutely still need us parents, but interaction with their peers is very important too.
 

Umbrella Girl

Now we see through a glass, darkly; (1 Cor 13:12)
Yes. There are many, deeper elements involved, which is what I meant. Isolation can certainly exasperate other issues, but it, in and of itself, is not responsible for people killing themselves.

I used to catch rollover calls for a (government) Mental Health Emergency Services Hotline. I have talked guns off people's heads.

Suicide is largely a spiritual attack. Not saying there are not other mental illness elements, and certainly not saying that all mental illnesses are 'demon possessions'. I used to believe that. I learned otherwise.

And yes - even with a strong "spiritual grounding", when that thing shows up in the room w/ you.... it's hard to resist. Very hard. I cannot fathom what it is to face that w/o Christ. The fact that any unsaved person is able to defeat it, is solely an act of His intervention.

I used to believe that people who committed suicide were just 'selfish', and weak. When I experienced what I believe to be the thing that pushes people to do that, it utterly changed my understanding of the issue.

But lockdowns are not causing people to kill themselves. If anything, it's forcing people to be still, and they can't deal w/ what is in the stillness.
But not being able to deal with what is in the “stillness” of isolation could be enough to push a vulnerable individual off the emotional ledge they were teetering on...
 
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